Big Profits from New Wave of Travel

BY Joshua Belanger | June 16, 2020 

Americans have been antsy and looking to enjoy the warm months.

Unfortunately, everything this summer has been cancelled.

Sure, most of the time it’s easier and quicker to hop on a plane and check into an Airbnb.

But there’s going to take some time before people are ready to resume old vacation habits.

Airbnb has launched enhanced cleaning protocol.

It’s going to cost hosts more money…which in turn will be passed onto guests.

Airplanes are full of recycled cabin air, and who knows when the bathroom at the truck stop was cleaned.

Plus, what are you even going to do on vacation? Not everywhere is open yet. You don’t want to be in a crowd of people.

So a lot of families are planning the classic road trip.  

Luckily, there are 3.1 million square miles of the continental U.S. to explore and participate in outdoor activities.

So, pack the kids in the RV and hit the road.

Grab This Iconic Brand in the RV Space

When it comes to motorhomes, none is more iconic than the Winnebago.

The Chieftain is one of the most recognizable models. Think the Walking Dead and cult classic Spaceballs.

The concept of family camping is nothing new. The first public campgrounds appeared in the early 1900s. These provided a place for families to set up tents and enjoy nature with some protection for novice campers.

The first "housecar" was introduced in 1910, but RV production wouldn’t take off until After WWII.

Motorhomes came into the mainstream in the 60s as an acceptable option for suburbanites who wanted to travel but scoffed at the travel trailer.

John Hanson founded Winnebago on the idea that "the cheapest way to get things done is to do them yourself." The company proudly produced nearly all its own components. The exception at the time was the chassis.

The design of the motorhome has changed in the past 50 years, but Winnebago still equates to luxury travel.

The company’s business has expanded but is easily divided into three sections.

First, it still has its classic motorhomes. This includes classes A, B, and C plus a line of accessibility enhanced drivables.

It also has its towable line. This including toy haulers and fifth wheels.

Finally, it has a marine segment. This segment was added in 2018 when Winnebago acquired Chris-Craft with the intention to break into the marine market.

Why stop at just dominating the RV market? Instead, it’s looking to solidify itself as a premier outdoor lifestyle company in multiple categories.

Take a look at this slide from the most recent investor presentation:

Even 50 years later, Winnebago is still growing. Not just growing… it’s outperforming the industry.

This is especially important to note as we come out of the Coronavirus slump.

More and more people are going to turn to RVs as a way to travel with their families. Especially with this drop in gasoline prices.

When looking at the overall trends in the RV industry over the past 50 years, has prices are one of the best indicators of future sales of RVs.

They’re not light vehicles. Motorhome owners quickly find out that the average motorhome usually gets between 6-14 miles to every gallon of gas. With the current national average gas price just above $2, that’s 70 cents cheaper than the same time last year.

It’s a perfect storm. And Americans are going to realize RV camping is the way to spend summer vacation…especially if mom and dad can clock some hours working from their laptops along the way.

Shares have been on a tear since hitting a low on March 18th.

There’s still an opportunity to ride this trend.

Buy shares of Winnebago on one of the dips in the rocky market. Then sit back and enjoy the ride.

Joshua M. Belanger

Joshua Belanger is the editor of Hot Money Trader and Wealthy Tech Investor. After leaving Wall Street on his own terms, Joshua has been providing ordinary investors blockbuster returns since 2008. In 2018, the average return of Hot Money Trader beat the markets by over 15%.
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